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Full text of "The ear-ring : an opera in one act"

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7 



TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE 



DOWAGER MARCHIONESS OF DOWNSHIRE. 



THE EAR-RIN 



AN OPERA IN ONE ACT 



THE MUSIC BY 



F. SCHIRA. 



PRICE FIVE SHILLINGS 



LONDON: 

C. JEFFERYS, 57, BERNERS STREET, W^. 



The HarDwniiim Accompaniment may be had separately, price 2s. ; 
■when this is used the pai'ts marked " Hannoniuvt Solo " in the Pianoforte Score must be omitted. 



Digitized by tlie Internet Arciiive 

in 2013 



littp://arcliive.prg/details/earringoperainonOOsclii 



TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE 



DOWAGER MARCHIONESS OF DOWNSHIRE. 



THE EAR-RING. 



AN OPERA IN ONE ACT 



THE MUSIC BY 



F. SCHIRA, 



PRICE FIVE SHILLINGS. 



LONDON: 

C. JEFFERYS, 57, BERNERS STREET, W. 



Tlie Harinoniuvi Accompaniment may be had separately, price 2s. ; 
when this is used the parts marked " Harvwninm Solo " in the Pianoforte Score vmst be omitted. 



THE EAR-RING. 



%n i^ptvn in mt ^tt 



Music by F. SCHIRA. 



Alfred ... 

Countess Belleville 
Lucy, her Maid ... 
Jean, Groom 



Tenor. 
Soprajw. 
Contralto. 
Bass. 



\_Scene lies in Paris, in the Coimtess's house. Drawing- 
room. Principal door in C. opetiing to ante-room. 
Door R. and L. door. L. opens into small room, 
with window into street. L., bureau and table. R., 
chimney a?id fire ; clock, &c., ajtd an agate ctcp, 
holding jewels, canseuse, &c. L., a piano {rather 
forward). Portrait of gent. Room, tastefully 
furnisJud. 

SCENE I. 

Lucy discovered, with drawing materials in her hand. 



Lucy. 
draw. 



Ah ! ah ! ah ! ah ! what a scrape — I cannot 

Though I can't make a sketch, yet I 

On painters all do dote ; 
On singers too, yet though I try, 

I cannot sing a note. 
I love him who from marble cold 

A life-like form can raise ; 
To me so dear no crown of gold 

As coronet of bays. 
An artisfs life is dear to me, 

An artist's wife I fain would be ! 

A painter I could love, but though 

Another came before. 
To put the question, "Yes or No ?" 

A sculptor I'd adore. 
A true Bohemian I'd wed, 

But as my fancies wing, 
By music all my thoughts are led — 

A singer is the thing ! 
An artist's life is dear to me, 

An artist's wife I fain would be 

Enter CoUNTESS. 

Countess. Oh Lucy ! on your favourite hobby- 
horse again ? 

Lucy. Yes, so please your ladyship. 

Countess. Lucy, how long have I been a widow? 

Lucy. Just fifteen months, my lady. 

Countess. And what do you think of my guar- 
dian. Monsieur de Brissac .'' 

Lucy. WTiat ? your ladyship's intended .' Why, I 
think he has too much shirt-collar and not enough 
whisker. Qh ! he is not at all like an artist. 

Countess. Lucy, you are always raving about 
artists. (Sits.) 



Lucy. Yes, my lady, I adore artists. When I 
lived with Mde. de Coigny, there used to come sculp- 
tors and painters and musicians, and I was happy as 
the day was long. 

Countess. I know you have made up your mind 
that I shall never marry M. de Brissac. At what 
hour was he to call, and take me to the concert .-' 

Lucy. At nine o'clock, my lady. But do you 
know you would like the society of artists very much, 
if you only knew them ; and — excuse me for saying 
it — the proof is, that your ladyship is always thinking 
of the time you spent in Brittany before your mar- 
riage, five years ago. You remember, my lady, there 
were no fine gentlemen there, but plenty of artists, 
and you say it was the happiest time in your life. 

Countess (risi7ig). It is true : I do regret Brit- 
tany, and something besides, Lucy ; I regret my 
preserver, the young shepherd, who lived in the moun- 
tains of Cornouailles, and who used to sing so sweetly. 

Lucy. Lor' ! I never heard of him before ! 



Countess. 



Lucy. 



Countess. 



Lucy- 
Countess. 



duet. 

In Brittany long years ago, 
With wa>^vard thoughts my heart was laden, 

I to a village fete did go , 
In costume of a village maiden. 

When homewards o'er the mountain vale, 
My steps at eventide were drafted. 

The path I missed, till on the air 
The sounds of a sweet voice were wafted ! 
Oh ! ne'er shall I forget 
The sounds of the sweet voice 

Of that poor shepherd lad, 
Which made my heart rejoice ! 

Can you, my lady, those sweet sounds recall ? 
Oh ! happy shepherd thine heart to enthrall ! 

" The livelong day by mountain side, 

I tend my bleating, wand'ring flocks, 
And homewards lead at eventide, 

From herbage sweet among the rocks ; 
And when they rest in soft repose, 

I lie 'mong flov\''rs and fragrant th)-me, 
Inhaling scents of sweet wild rose 

And creeping plants that near me climb. 
Oh yes ! a shepherd's life for me, 

The breeze that's wafted through the dell 
Is not more buoyant or more free, 

A life it is, none can excel !" 

That song is pretty, many a one a worse is ! 

Yes ! and there were no less than twenty verses. 
I followed the sound, 

At length I found 
Myself at a poor dwelling, 



And seated there, 
Him, to the air 
Whose sorrows had been telHng. 
His mossy couch to me he gave, 

Then gravely he departed, 
Nor saw I his fair form again. 
Since from his hut I started. 

Ensemble. Oh ! tender songs of heartfelt love, 

TT^ [ heart was prison'd in their chain, 

How bitter did the sequel prove — 
To love, and not to meet again. 

Lucy. Oh ! then your ladyship really loved him ? 

Countess {laughing). Well, perhaps I did. Yes, 
his wild nature and indifference pleased me. He ap- 
peared unconscious of my presence. I asked him to 
sing, and he sung — that was all. Once I met him far 
from his mountains, and he did not even remember 
me. I could not help feeling annoyed, but it was not 
his fault, for how could he recognize me in my fine 
clothes {sighing) ? Ah ! I really believe there was a 
moment when I wished I was a poor girl of Cor- 
nouailles ; but I soon blushed at my folly. 

Lucy. And you lost no time in becoming the 
Countess de Belleville. 

Countess. Was I wrong, think you, in that .■* 

Lucy. Oh dear no ! Your ladyship was fortunate 
enough to become a widow in a very short time. But 
suppose you were to return to Brittany, my lady .-' 

Countess. You silly child {/oo^s at clock) ! How 
very extraordinary ! How is it that M. de Brissac 
does not come .'' He told me he was going to the 
races at Auteuil, and I think he said he was to ride 
one race himself But he promised to return at nine 
o'clock. 

Lucy. Then, no doubt, my lady, he is riding 
now ; or — I mean — oh ! if he could break his neck ! 

Countess. Lucy ! leave the room ! 

Lucy. Oh ! forgive me, my lady ! 

Countess. No more ! — go ! And when you see 
M. de Brissac's carriage arrive, let my aunt know, as 
she has promised to accompany us to the concert to- 
night. Go ! 

Lucy. Yes, my lady. {Aside, going) All the 
same he may have broken his neck. {Exit.) 

Countess. The silly girl has quite frightened 
me {humming). How foolish I am ! That stupid song 
always makes me feel inclined to cry ; I will think of 
something else — something cheerful — M. de Brissac, 
for instance {looks at portrait). He should have been 
painted on horseback ; his horse is so very handsome 
{yawns). I am bored to death : what shall I do while 
I am waiting for him } Shall I work ">. No {looks at 
piano) ; I will sing {sits at piano). Now then, black 
spirits and white ! will you talk to me of Lizst or 
Thalberg, Weber or Mozart {turning over music) ? 
What's this ? — oh ! " Studies of the Heart," by 
" Alfred." That's the composer I was reading about 
yesterday ! What a strange history it was ! — and so 
sad ! They say he is only twenty-five years old, and 
he has already had so many misfortunes — so young 
— so talented ! I should like to know him {jplays) : all 
his music is simple ! 



SONG. 



I. 



Say why, my heart, so wildly beating, 

Dost thou such emotion prove ? 
Canst thou, when thy lover meeting. 
Fear his truth, or doubt his love? 
No, fondly, no ! 
My bosom sighs ! 
No, gently, no ! 
My heart replies ! 
Then, fond heart, be silent ever, 

Be thy wild emotion o'er ; 
For with doubt and fearing never 
Shall it throb I no, never more. 



II. 

Light of life, and life's best blessing, 

Is the love that meets return, 
Can I, that rich boon possessing. 

E'er the matchless blessing spsrn. 

No, fondly, no ! &c. 
Ejtter Lucy, running. 

Lucy {laughing). My lady ! my lady ! 

Countess. Well ! what is it .? 

Lucy. Oh, I have had such a turn ! As I was 
pulling down the blinds in the ante-room just "now, I 
spied a man's hat under the window ; I looked again, 
and saw a head under the hat ; I looked a third time, 
and saw a man under the head, which was swearing 
frightfully, and making all kinds of grimaces. He 
was beating time with his cane, and every now and 
then said, " Dolce," " Espressivo," " Sacrebleu !" 

Countess. What >. 

Lucy. I burst out laughing, but he did not stir, 
and he said, " Not the least sentiment or feeling ! — 
not a particle of ear ! — no soul for music 1" 



Countess. Oh ! he said that, did he ? 

Lucy. Yes, and a grea-t deal more. 
" Who can the idiot be .'" 



He said, 



Countess. What insolence ! so I sing out of tune, 
do I .'' and I have no ear } Am I not in my own 
house .'' and have I not a right to sing out of tune, if 
I like ? and I will prove to this insolent intruder — 

S^Sits at piano, and plays. 

Lucy. You are quite right, my lady. 

\Goes to window of ante-room. 

Countess {to Lucy, who has opened the window in 
the ante-room). Well ! what is he about now .-" 

Lucy. He is rampaging about like a hungry lion 
— now he has broken his stick ! 

Countess {laughing immoderately, and playing 
wrong). Ah I ah ! ah ! this is capital ! {Sings.) Now 
he will hear somethingf out of tune. 



DUET. 

Countess. Who talks of music's dulcet joys ? 
All I care for is a noise, 
Neither time, nor tune, nor measure, 
Give to me the smallest pleasure ! 



Come and sing with me, Lucy. 



A duo. I like sounds so quick and loud, 
When we in a ball room crowd, 
Trumpets, flutes, fiddles scraping, {Imitating the 
And dancers flying, jostling, leaping, instruments.') 

Lucy. Or in the tent at village fair, 

When our sweetheart meets one there, 
We dance to music, shrill and clear, 
The sounds to country maiden dear. 

\Something falls into the room. 

Countess. Good gracious ! can it be possible .■" 
he is throwing stones at us. 

Lucy {who has picked up paper a7id opened it). No, 
my lady, it is two pennies. 

Countess. Two pennies } 

Alfred {without, from the street). Aye ! and it is 
more than you deserve. 

Countess {^furious). Was there ever such imper- 
tinence .'' — but I have no idea of being dictated to by 
a stranger passing under my window. 

\Jiell heard. 

Lucy. Oh, my lady ! that's the door-bell — some- 
one is ringing. 

Countess. I am glad he is come at last. If he 
had been a little more punctual, this would not have 
happened. It's all his fault ! Of course it is M. 
de Brissac, so go, Lucy, and tell my aunt I shall be 
ready to accompany her to the concert in ten minutes. 
(Exit Lucy.) There's what a poor widow is exposed 
to ; I cannot even play or sing in my own room, with- 
out being insulted by some maniac who passes by my 
window ; but I won't stand it ! No ! I am deter- 
mined. I'll marry, and leave this house. 

\_Sits before fire, and takes up a book. 

Enter Alfred, preceded by Lucy. He runs forward, 
looks round, and then rushes to piano. 



TRIO. 

Alfred. A piano ! — yes, I must be right, 

This is the place whence came that strain. 

Countess. What brings this stranger to my sight ? 
Your business sir ! come state it plain ! 

Lucy. He looks just like an artist, quite, 

And really he is far from plain ! 

Alfred. Your pardon, Madame ! Was it you 

Whose singing pained my ear } 

Countess. Your pardon sir ! — and was it you 
Did at m.y singing jeer? 

Alfred. You played, "The Studies of the Heart?" 

Countess. I did ! 

Alfred. The melody in B ? 

Countess. Just so. 

Alfred. Then why did you depart 

From these directions ? here you see — 

[ Takes music off piano. 

Countess. Your pardon, sir ! I think you dropped 
your money ere the music stopped. 

\(ji'ves him pennies. 

Alfred. Excuse me, but I 

Could not stand by. 
Hear an Adagio played like a jig ; 

I could not bear 

To hear that air 
Sung with a jerk, like the squeak of a pig ! 



Lucy. 

Alfred. 
Countess. 



Oh ! with fire my heart is raging, 
Which will ne'er know aught assuaging, 

And my bosom's fire is guaging 

The fierce contest which I'm waging. 



Countess {to Lucy). Give this good gentleman a 
light, and show him to the door. {Curtseys, and exit.) 

Lucy {aside). I daresay this is Monsieur " Sacre- 
bleu." 

Alfred. Ah {takes his hat)\ It seems I have 
tumbled on a Duchess. By Jove, so much the 
worse, for those great ladies fancy they are privileged 
to do anything— even to sing out of tune. What airs 
she gave herself {imitating CoUNTESS) ! " Lucy, give 
this gentleman a light, and then show him to the 
door." 

Lucy (who is waiting at door with a lighted candle) 
That's what I am waiting for, sir. 

Alfred. Go ! you bore me ! Perhaps I ought 
to have told her she sang like an angel. To turn me 
out — me — in such an unceremonious way, too. It's 
true I did not tell her my name — however, if she were 
to return, I could. No, I am too angry — let's see — 
ah ! not a bad idea. {Aside) I don't hear her ; I 
suppose I must give it up. Good-bye, my good girl ! 

Lucy. I never saw such a man — he must be an 
artist. 

Alfred {sees a miniature of Countess). Ah, a 
miniature I 

Lucy. It's the portrait of my mistress. 

Alfred. Really ! she is very pretty. I did not 
remark her before — what is her name .'' 

Lucy. Bertha. 

Alfred. "Bertha.-'" it's a very pretty name. 
{Looks at Lucy, then glares.) By Jove ! Do you 
know you are a very fine woman 1 

Lucy. Do you think so, sir .'' 

Alfred. Yes, I do {lookhig her over); yes, and 
very artistically put together. 

Lucy {aside). He's quite mad! {Aloud) Shall 
I light you down, sir } 

Alfred. What country do you come from } 

Lucy. From Spain, sir. 

Alfred. Oh, really ! From Spain, are you 1 
{Aside) I must gain time. {Aloud) Oh! then as 
you are from Spain, you must sing me a song. 

Lucy. With great pleasure. 



SONG. 

Lucy. I once knew an artist. 

As fair as Apollo, 
The art of a painter. 

He vowed he would follow. 
Ah ! I remember him only too well, 
For at love-making he was known to excel. 



Alfred. But it is a very pretty song {looking 
L.) ; sing louder. 



Lucy. He painted my portrait, 

I sat and admired him, 

He made me believe 
I with true love had fired him, 

I gave him my heart. 
But now he is gone. 
And I am left mourning so sadly alone. 



Alfred. It's very pretty, indeed. {Aside.) De- 
cidedly she won't come, so I must give it up. {Aloud) 
Lucy, she's horribly proud, that mistress of yours, 
that Madame — Madame .-" 

Lucy. Countess de Belleville. 

Alfred. Oh ! she's a Countess, is she i* — then I am 
not surprised {sees M. de Brissacs picture) ; and I sup- 
pose that's the Count de Belleville .-• 

Lucy. Oh, no ! the Count de Belleville is dead. 

Alfred {goes near the picture). Oh ! the Count is 
dead, is he .■" Well, I must say that gentleman looks 
as if he were dead, too. 

Lucy. Far from it : he is going to marry the 
Countess. It's M. de Brissac. 

Alfred {starts involuntarily). Ah ! he's going to — 
but what is it to me .'' Let her marry him, if she likes. 
M. de Brissac {struck by an idea) — yet stay ! — M. de 
Brissac — that name I^surely I heard it mentioned just 
now .'' — ah ! I remember ; he was at the club this 
afternoon. 

Lucy. No doubt ; my lady is waiting for him to 
take her to the concert. 

Alfred. Then she will have to wait some time. 
I heard M. de Brissac make a bet that he would ride 
backwards all the way to Auteuil in half-an-hour. 

Lucy. That is a good joke, when my lady is wait- 
ing for him. 

Alfred. He may get there by to-morrow morn- 
ing. Good-bye. {Going) 

Lucy. I hope you are in earnest this time. 

Alfred. Eh .-• you hope 1 well, no : {returning) 
I am not going. I cannot go without having her 
forgiveness. {Aside) I must see her — speak to her. 
One more attempt to bring her from her room. 



\Goes to piano, and sings. 



SONG. 

Alfred. Oh ! my life is weary, weary, 

All alone the live-long day, 
It's confounded dreary, dreary, 
Slow the hours pass away. 



Alfred. She won't come — oh, this is obstinacy, 
but I'll be obstinate, too ! 



\Plays and sings very loudly. 



Oh for woman's smiles to bless me, 
Oh for woman's voice to cheer, 

Woman's hand, too, to caress me. 
When no other soul is near. 



During the symphony, the Countess opens the door, 
and comes down smiling ; a purse in her hand, 
between piano and table. 

Alfred {aside). I have succeeded. 

Countess {to Alfred, giving purse). Will you 
accept } 

Alfred {rising). A purse {laughs) ! 

Countess. It contains twenty-five louis — the sum 
I usually give artists who sing for me. 

Alfred. Madame, this is ungenerous ! 

Countess. Name your own price, then. 

Alfred. Your forgiveness ! 

Countess. That is too much to ask. 

\_She puts purse on piano, and passes to R. 

Alfred {aside). Again ! ah ! {Aloud) I accept, 
Madame {writes on paper from bureau), for the poor. 
I am to sing to-night for their benefit. Here is my 
receipt. {Puts paper on table) 

Countess {slightly embarrassed). Sir ! 

Alfred. You have had your revenge, Madame : 
you are right. (CoUNTESS coughs) I deserve your 
anger, and also the reproach conveyed by that little 
cough {bozus). (Countess curtseys.) Madame — {Aside.) 
How icy cold ! I like her picture tiest {bows). {Aloud.) 
Believe me, Madame — that is — do not believe — I 
mean, be so kind as — {Aside) Confound it ! I do 
not know what I do mean. {Aloud) Madame, adieu! 

[ Turns to exit, R. 
Lucy. . Not that way, sir. 

\SJiows him out ; exit brusquely. 

Countess. I never saw such a man {laughs and 
sighs). He sings very well ; he has such a sympa- 
thetic voice, and so sweet ! {Re-enter Lucy.) Lucy, 
what did that gentleman say to you .'' 

Lucy. Oh, he told me I was a very fine woman. 
He said, too, that M. de Brissac started from the club 
about an hour ago to ride to Auteuil, backwards ! 

Countess. What do you mean ? 

Lucy. It was a bet, my lady. 

Countess. I like that, indeed, when he knows I 
am waiting for him {gets angry). Really, M. de 
Brissac seems to care very little. I should not have 
been surprised if that strange man had been guilty of 
such rudeness. But, talking of him, he is very good- 
looking. I wonder what his name is {taking up paper 
on which Alfred had written) — but, now I think of it, 
this receipt — oh, what hieroglyphics ! Good gracious ! 

Lucy. What's the matter, my lady t 

Countess. {Reads.) "Jules Alfred, composer." 
I cannot help thinking that I have seen his face 
before. I fancy I have heard his voice, too : but I 
am sure he is not entirely unknown to me. Here, 
Lucy, help me to dress. 

[ Takes off shawl, jacket, and gloves. 



J 



Lucy. What hands! I think even M. Alfred 
would be satisfied with these. 

Door L. opens suddenly ; enter ALFRED. LUCY and 
Countess scream. Ah! 



Alfred. I entreat your pardon, Madame. It 
seems fated that I am not to leave this house. I don't 
complain, but — 

Countess. But I do, sir ! 

Alfred. It is not my fault, Madame. I had every 
intention of flying from one who, alas ! has treated 
me so cruelly, but — 

Countess. I see — I must provide you with a 
guide. 

Alfred {aside). " A light," I suppose she means 
{trying to make an excuse for stopping). Pardon me, 
Madame, but I put a few notes together that I should 
be so proud if I might sing to you. Let us try 
together. 



DUET. 

When music's charms fall on my ears, 
Then sweet enchantment calms my fears, 
When tuneful voices sing a lay. 
And drive sad spirits far away ; 
They with each strain of harmony, 
Bring peace and joy to you and me. 



Alfred. You smile — you have forgiven me .' 

Countess. Well, yes ! Monsieur Alfred, I forgive 
the scatterbrained man for the sake of the clever 
artist. I don't say, " Adieu !" but " Au revoir !" 

Alfred. Oh, Madame ! 

Countess. We part friends, but we must part. 

Lucy. Oh, my lady, do you hear the rain .'' 

Alfred {aside). Bravo ! {Aloud) I can"t possibly 
go out : I catch cold so easily. 

Countess {aside). It's not my fault if he is obliged 
to remain a little longer. {Aloud.) Lucy, order the 
carriage for M. Alfred. 

Lucy. Yes, my lady. {Aside) M. de Brissac is 
going "backwards:" there is no doubt about that. 
{Exit) 

Servant brings tea on a tray, and sets it on table. 
Countess makes tea. Servant retires. 

Countess. Sit down, M. Alfred. 

Alfred. A thousand thanks, Madame ! {Aside) 
Now then, courage, Alfred ! 

\_Goes to chimney. 

Countess. You are going to sing at Herz's con- 
cert to-night, I believe .'' 

Alfred {standing by fire). No ; I cannot sing to- 
night. 



Countess. Why not .? 

Alfred. I should sing out of tune — I should be 
thinking of you. 

Countess. Thank you. 

Alfred. Oh, Madame ! I did not mean that. I 
made a mistake. I meant — {Aside) That's a bad 
beginning. 

Countess. Will you have a cup of tea } {He sits) 

Alfred. A thousand thanks ! {Smiling) 

Countess {beginning to feel slightly embarrassed). 
The rain is not so heavy, I think } 

Alfred {absently). Yes, it rains harder than ever. 
Good gracious ! they say every man once in his life 
has his destiny in his own hands, and — 

Countess. Have you no friends .' 

Alfred. None, Madame, I swear to you ! 

Countess. Will you accept my friendship } 

Alfred {with passion). Your friendship only.' 

Countess {severely). M. Alfred ! 

Alfred. My dear Madame ! you don't know what 
you are doing. You are not aware that if you marry 
M. de Brissac you will die of the " blue devils." He 
will spend his days in the stables, and his nights at 
the gambling-table. 

Countess. Leave me, sir ! I implore you ! 

Alfred. Madame de Belleville, I have offended 
you. Forgive me, I beseech — I know you will — for — 
I love you ! 

Countess {rises, touched, and moves away). Mon- 
sieur Alfred ! 

Alfred. Bertha ! 

Countess. What presumption ! Never dare to 
address me by that name again ! do you hear .'' I am 
not my own mistress ; I am betrothed to — 

Alfred. Do not utter his name. Oh, Bertha ! 

Countess. You must forget me — forget this even- 
ing — forget that we ever met. 

Alfred. Forget you, Bertha ! it is too late ! 
Scenes long past are brought to my memory ; it is 
her voice — her figure- — it is herself, — and yet — it is 
you ! 

Countess. And where did this vision appear to 
you .? 

Alfred. In the mountains of La Cornouaille. 

Countess {aside). Merciful powers ! 

Alfred. One night, I was watching the clouds, 
and singing, as was my custom, when my song at- 
tracted a young girl who had lost her way in the 
mountains. She asked me for shelter, and I per- 
suaded her to accept what I could offer. It was hap- 
piness to see her under my humble roof, while I kept 
watch outside. 

Countess {agitated). And the girl you so kindly 
sheltered ; what became of her .' 



Alfred. When daylight came, she returned to 
the village, and I never beheld her more ; but, thank 
goodness, I have something belonging to her — some- 
thing which fell from her as she lay on my couch. 

Countess. What is it > 

Alfred. A jewel : this little ear-ring ! 

Countess (aside). Then it is indeed he ! 

Alfred {gaily pointing to tJie ear-ring). Poor little 
ear-ring ! we have never parted, and yet I had to beg 
my bread on foot all the way to Paris. Providence 
gave me some little musical talent, and after cultivat- 
ing it for five years, I became a fashionable composer 
(laughing). I must confess, however, that my pub- 
lisher has always declined printing my favourite 
romance of the mountains of Cornouaille. 



SONG. 

The livelong day by mountain side, 

I tend my bleating, wand'ring flocks, 
And homewards lead at eventide, 

From herbage sweet among the rocks. 
Oh yes ! a shepherd's life for me. 

The breeze that's wafted through the dell 
Is not more buoyant or more free, 

A life it is, none can excel ! 



Alfred. And now, have it, Madame. Is it so 
very ugly .' ( Wipes away a tear, and tries to laugh) 
Forgive me ! what a fool I am (seeing that the COUNT- 
ESS has also tears in her eyes)\ But you, Madame, 
you have also tears in your eyes ! 

Countess. Oh, it is nothing ({doith an effort)\ 
Adieu ! M. Alfred. 

Alfred. Madame ! 

Countess {innch affected). Adieu ! 

\_She moves towards her room, when LuCY enters. 

Lucy. Oh, my lady ! the Count's groom, Jean, 
has just come, and insists upon seeing you. He has 
brought a letter which he will deliver to no one but 
your ladyship. 

Countess. Let him come in, Lucy (agitated). 
(Exit Lucy.) Merciful Heaven ! if some accident 
should have befallen M. de Brissac ! 

Re-enter LuCY, showing in Jean. 



FINALE. 

Countess. Ho ! Jean ! what brings you here 1 

Jean (whimpering). My master sends you greeting, 
An accident he's met with, 

His life may e'en be fleeting, 
So to your ladyship 

He sends this. billet doux, 
To keep him in your mind. 

Till he can come and sue ! 

Countess {taking it). What does this mean, 

This is to " Madlle. Angeline." 

Alfred and Lucy. What can it mean, 

A note for '' Madlle. Angeline ! " 



Jean. 



Rage and shame my senses fetter, 
I've been and given the wrong letter. / 



Countess (reads). " My adored Angeline ! I shall 
be with you this evening." 'Tis enough ! 

(To Jean.) Go you, sir, unto your master, 

Tell him now that he is free. 

Free to seek another mistress. 
But never more to come to me. 

(To Alfred.) And since you so well have pleaded, 
You shall sing to me again. 

That song cherished in my memorj' — 
The peasant's plaintive strain. 

Alf. {Impassioned^ You, then, know it ! oh what rapture 
Fills my heart at that sweet thought, 

My bright vision of the mountain, 
Back to me again is brought — 

For mercy speak — are you, then, she ? 

Countess (going to casket). 

I have the other ear-ring here you see ! 

Bertha. Bertha ! dearest Bertha ! oh, my love ! 

\_Falls upon his knees. 

Lucy. Hurrah ! what weight 

My wisdom carries— 

My lady now 
An artist marries. 

Jean (to Lucy). Let's make a match, 
Of grooms I'm smartest. 

Lucy. A groom, tho' fine. 

Is not an artist. 

Ensemble. Oh I the radiant moments winging, 

On their flight to happy hours, 

Brightest happiness are bringing, 

While Fortune's favour showers. 

Heart, in heart, together twining, 

They'll K ... .. 

We'll 1 sorrow bid adieu, 

Never more to be repining. 
But with love, life to renew. 



Fine. 



THE EAR RING 



AN OPERA IN ONE ACT 

Music by 
F. SCHIRA. 



HARiyiON: SOLO 



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Andante 

Mosso . 




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The Ear-ring. F. Schira. 



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THOUGH I CANT lYIAKE A SKETCH. 



m 1 . 



Words by 
DESMOND L. RYAN 



SONG 



Music by 
F. SCHIRA . 



Moderato 



VOICE. 



PIANO 





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sketch, yet I, yet I On painters all do 



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love him who from mar ble cold 

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bays— An art.istVHfe, is dear to me. An artJst's wife I faia would 

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The Ear. ring. F.Schil"*'. 





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love, but though, Dut though A _ noth_er came be. _ fore. 



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// 



The Ear- Ting, F. Schira. 



IN BRITAINNY LONG YEARS AGO. 



mj9. 



Words by 
DESMOND L.RYAN. 



DUET. 



Countess. 



Music by 
F. SCHIRA 



VOICE 



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In Britan.ny long years a 



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wa\-.wftrd thoughts my heart m as la _ den I to a vil.lage fete did go 



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costume of a vil .. lage maiden 

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en homewards o'er the mount ain 





The Ear-ring. F. Schira. 



10 



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drafted, The path I miss'd 



'till on the air The sounds of a sweet 




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con sentimenfu. 



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voice a sweet voice were wafted Oh ne'er shall I for_ o-^'^ The sounds of the sweet 



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Lucy. 



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voice, Of that poor shepherd lad,Which made my heart re.joicei Oh happy 



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•'^ sliepherd thine heart to en_ .thrall I Can you, my 



la_dv those sweet sounds vv 




The Ear ring. F, Schira 




flocks, And homeward lead at e_ 

/^ PIANO rORTE . 



_ven_tide. From herbaire sweet a_ mong the 




rocks, And when they rest in soft re _ pose I lie 'mong flow'rsand frag _ rant 




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thyme, 



. . . In _ hal _ ing scents of sweet wild rose,Avil(l rose 



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me oh yes for me . . . 



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The breeze that's waf _ ted through the 

dim. 



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dell, yes through the dell 



Is not morebuoj-ant or more 




Tile E.ir- ring. F. Schira, 



13 



Sotto voce. 



mar endu . 





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The Ear-ring. F. Sehira. 



14 



b J J —J — ^^ J » -W I? J _ 

at a poor dwelling, And sea _ _ Jted there, 

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Him, to the 



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air, Whose sorrows had been tell.ing. His mos.sy couch to me he gave,Then 



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lento. 



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a piacere 



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grave- _ ly he, de_ .parted, 

rot//. HARM .-SOLO. 



Nor saw I his fair form a_ 



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-gain, Sincefromhis hut I parted. 

PIANO FORTE. f^ 



Oh tender songs of heartfelt 



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Count. 



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Oh ten _ der songs of heart -felt 



love 



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love Oh ten _ 



der songs of heart -felt 



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The Ear- ring. r.Sfhira. 



i 



Countess . 
Allegretto. 



15 



leggieru. 



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LUCY, 



Ohitender songs of heart_felt love. 



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My heart was 



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Oh.'tender songs of heart_felt love 



Her heart was 




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PIANO FORTE 



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pris-on'd in their chain, 



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How bit _ ter bit _ ter did the se _ quel 



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pris.on'd in their cli,i;ii. 



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prove the se quel prove;To love and not to meet a_ _ gain I ah! . 



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did the se_ _quel prove; To love and not to meet a_ _ gain.' ah.' . 




The Ear- ring . F. Schira . 




ffMeno mosso . 



16 



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love and not to 

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meet a_gain, To love and not to 



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To love and not to meet a -gain. To love and not to 



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meet a.gain, Oh ten_der songs of heartfelt love. Oh songs of heartfelt 



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leartfeTt lov 



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meet a_gain, Oh ten.der songs of ^ 




e,Oh songs of heartfelt 



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love I . 



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love! To love and not to meet a_ _ 



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Th»- Ear-ring. F.Srhira. 



17 



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^ gain To love and not to meet 



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-gain a « gain 



to love ... . ah .' And not to meet a _ 



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And not to meet to meet a _ gain ... to love ... .ah.' And not to meet a _ 




The Ear-ring . F. Snhira. 



Lo stesso tempo. 



18 



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V ' ' ' r — —y ' ■ ' 7 * - V — 

_ -gain, Ah to love to love, and not meet a _ gain, Ah to love and 



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_ _ gain, Ah to love to love, and not meet a _ gain, Ah to love and 




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not meet a _ gain . . . 

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To love and not to meet a 



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not meet a _ gain . . . 

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To love and not to meet a _ gain 




.... oh .' love 1 



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oh I love .' 



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TIh' Ear-ring . F. Srhira . 



19 



SAY WHY lYIY HEART SO WILDLY BEATING. 



ms. 



SONG. 



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Maestoso. 



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harm: SOLO. 



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F. SCHIRA, 

PIAHO FORTE . 



P. ^ 



Countess. Modt9 Agitato. 



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heart so wild _ ly beat_ing? 



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say why? 



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Dost thou dost thou such e_ mo _ tion , ah.' such e_ mo_tion prove 




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harm; solo 



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Canst thou when thy 



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canst thou? 



3 



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HARM-.SOLO 



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r^ 



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The Ear-ring. F. Schira. 



a piacere. sotfo voce . 




The Kar- liiir' . F. Snhira . 



21 



teimta. 




m 



a tempo . 



1 1 



r — k 



no, no, my heart 



re _ plies .' 



no , no , no , 



^—z—^ 



:^ ^ •> 



eolla voce^. 



1 P 



-=V 









leggiere. a piacere 



i^mdl- 





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PIA^Q FORTE. 



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3d. V 



The Ear--ring. F. Schira.. 




Moderate Agitato, 



23 



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m 



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Ah : Then fond heart be 




si _ lent ev _ er . . . 



ev _ er. 



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-ur 



HARM: SOLO. 



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Obl be thy \^il(l,"thy wild e _ mo.tion, thy wild e_mo_tion o'er 




£ 



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n 



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HARM -.SOLO 



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For with doubt and fear _ ing 



nev _ er 



n\ 



nev _ er 



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HARM : 



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a piacere, soffo voce. 



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s 



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Shall it throb? no nev^ _er morei no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, 

0\ 




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The Ear-ring. F. Schira. 



m 



Andaiite. 



83 
Con abbandonOf quasi a piacere, e con graziu 

K ^ A A 



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No, no, no, no fondly no I No, no, no, my bo»«ln si^hs 



flANO FORTE 







no, no. No, no gently no, 



no, no, No my heart replies.' 




i 



Poco piu mosso. 



P 



^ — I- 



No, fond.ly no 



my bosom sighs 



ah 




no, no, my heart 



*#: 



s 




re _ plies J no, no, no, no, 



my heart re_ 



V 



W 



colla voce. 



hk y. J 



K- 



1 r tti* =^ 



-^V-F- 



1«2- 



The Ear-riJ^g. F.Srhira, 



24 
leggieroj a piacere. 





r\ 



a 



PIANO FORTE . 



I 



harm: solo , 



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1 



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s 



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Pfd. 



The Ear riiif; . F. arliira. 



* 



Fed. V 
ff 



25 



m4. 



WHO TALKS OF lYIUSIC'S DULCET JOYS. 



DUET. 



F. SCHIRA 



VOICE 



PIANO. 



i 



Allegro Moderate. 



Countess, (all the duet to be sunc purposely in a coarse manner) 



N S 



# — —0- 



^ 



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^ 



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Who talks of music's dul _ cet joys? 



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ff w 



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♦ — #- 

m 



n 



m • 



m » 



ff 



Ped. 



% 



Ped, 



» m 




/ '\ /^ V \ V V V =¥- 



a noise J All I care 



m 



k tt 



• — ♦ 



•— ^ 



t ^ 



9 — »■ 



Neith_er time, nor tune, nor measure, Give to 



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♦ — • 



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P 



P 



K: 



P 



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S= 



fe^=^ 



me the small-est pleasureino, 

^ K N 



no, no. 



Give to me the smallest pleasurelAll I 



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Sr 



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m 



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The Ear-ring. F. Schira , 



ifc3=3: 



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t- k 



k V 



^^ 



i 



26 






it 



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fe 



5? 



Mi:"n: p 



:z: 



Njri^iiTi 



fe 



oarefor is a noise <ill I care for is a noise Neither time,nor tune,nornieasure,GiTe to 



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eon sgarbo. 



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me the smallest pleasureino no Neither time nor tune, no, 



fc 



i 



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^HARNi: no, 

■ ^ PIANO FORTE. >.HARM: 



no, 

piAwg. FORTE, harm; 



'^niAU^mu^tl 



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V 






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tri — ^ 



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fel: 



IK) Give to ne the smallest pleasure.' no, 

PIANO FORTE . 



P 



no, no, no, nO) no, no. 



N 



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2 1 (! 1 



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kni 



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Ped. 



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accel. 



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Poco 
^ meno. 



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the smallest pleasure! no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no] Lu_cy 

js ^ i ^ X t>f Jr ^ M^ % , f n\ 



i 




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3=^3 






o 



fV- 






fcs^ 



^^ 



if-^ 



i 



.1 . .r I J • . .r 



K- 



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come, and sing" with 



me, 



come, sing" with me; la, la, la. 




fc 



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t-^ 



ii 



fc 



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f 



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The Ear rijig. F. Schira 



^i\i\jj\/v/\jv/\/\j\rfjN/\/\rj\jvArj\i\/\i\j\ft^^ 



I like sounds so quick and loud, When we in a ball room crowd I like 




27 






i 



v=^ 






-K- 



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U 1^ 



Ik 



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I like. 



^ 



s: 



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3=3: 



^=a=± 



I 



/ 



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3z=i==± 



1 1 g 



1 1 1 



/ 



y' V 



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3 



i\ ^ V ^ \ V ]/ V V W 



1 



-^1— F 



la la I like sounds so quick and loud 



N- r U, 



^ 



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£: 



P 



sounds so quick and loud and loud , 



When we 






3: 



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Wlien we in a ball room crowd 



Trumpets, fiddles. 



• • 



y-h 1 i-'j^ 



N K 



# 



^ 



^m 



V 



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S 



Jz^ 



in a ball room crowd 



Trumpets, fiddles, scraping", trumpets, flutes, fiddles, 




.^_ 



' ri^r, ri|T7 



imitando gVistromenti; 



TRUMPETS, 



^ 



f » f » • 



-^ 



g-^ 



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| g- p ^ k 



scraping" fid_dles scraping" scraping" yes, eehl 



ee 



h! 



tar_a _ ta 



Jill \>i^ • d 



S I N 



^ 



3 1 ' -=\ 



%J 



scraping- ^^ yes.. . scrap _ ing" . . . . eehJ 



HARM. 



^m 



3 



i 



M 



eehf 

, PIANO 



HAflM. 



tara _ ta 

PIANO FORTE. nk^f*. 



m 



IS3 



ltti 



rr=t 



^^ 



f 






^ 



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Ti.f Ear-ring, F.Schira 



6 1 ^ 



^ 



^ 



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V V 



28 



/ / 



VIOLINI. 



? 



i 



5:13: 



^s 



And dancers f ly_ ing", jost-Iing", leap_ing" yes yes eeh^ 



eeh 



i 



N N N 



^ 



N K 



K N 



Nr 



S 



g-^ 



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t^ 



And dancers fJy_ injr, iost_ linjj:, leap.iny: yes yes eehj 

PIANOFORTE. ' ^^ -^ ^' fS^ -' >.__ 



HAfllVi: 



eeh 



harm: 




PIANO ^^^^ 
FORTE./ ^ 



* 



4 



x. 



/i 



ffCJ'^C-lj' 



=^ 



'qa.1 ,^^ 



t^ 



Fed. 



TRUMPETS. 



Ped. ^ 



Ped. 



* 



^ 



m m 



4- 



N I m 



1} \r t 



ta_ ra_ ta 



:^ 



?i^ 



I» ^ 



And dan_cers fly- ing" jost_ling* leap-ing- I like I 



^. J.r-i- 



N S N il 



K K 



N N I ^ 



j | W i jJ w 



w ^ 



^ I ^ ^ 



%) 



ta_ ra_ta 



HARIVl; 



And dan_cers fly _ ing* jost.ling- Ieap_ing" I 

PIANO FORTE. ' 



like 




• like sounds quick and loud . . . and loud 




Thf f:ar-riMg . F. Kcliirfft 



29 



Lucy, 




<^b.] ,; ;■ .^1 -^ .r .^^ 



\. \. N I =f^ 



• • 



^ 



Ni N 



^ 



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* t) 



there. We dance to mu_sie, shrill and cli'ar,The sounds to country maid.ens dear. We dance to 



1=^ 



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it 



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mu 



_sic, shrill and clf-arjTlie sounds to coun_try maidens de*f-Hi*id _ ens . , . dear, dear, 




m 



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COUNTESS 



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fs: 



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IZI 



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I like sounds so quick and loud, yes When we in a ball room crowd, I like 
LUCY, 






N • N N 



1 1 



^ 



I like sounds, SO; quick and loud,yesWhen we 




K 



fs 



N 



in a biail room crowd. 



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li 



^ — ^ 



P 



f 



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n— f=- 



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* 



The Ear.ring. F. Schira. 



$ 



J' r 1 I r } S i 



30 



I like 



^m 



^t=^ 



/ 1/ y .1 ^ 



I like sounds so cfuick and loud When we in a ball room 



$ 



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55==s; 



r^ — R 



=^ — =^ 



sir 



like, 



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1 



like I lik«' sounds so quick and loud 



1/^ 1 1 



V^=^ 



g 



m 



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3 

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^ 



: /• 



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s^B 



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/ 





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VIOLIN/, cun ssrnrbo. 



v^ 



^ 



3 ^1 -^ 



ti3: 



and fid_d]es scraping" scraping" yes eehi 



eeh 



i J- I i- J ^: 



i=a=^ 



e 



jostling" Ieap_ing" yes 



^ 



^ 



ieap_ _ ing" 

-$ — 



eehi H*Riyi; eeh 



^ 



M 



HARM; 



t 




^ 



^ 



^T f 






S 



i»-^:h» 



^ 



jT I' 



PI* 



NO FaRTE./' 



f CJ^^Q/^-^ ^ 



[.Ij q J" 



TRUMPETS. 



Fed. * ^^.,7,,, * 



^^ 



J I r L J ^ 3 



"1 ?=4 



{2=^ 



P 



tara _ ta 



^ 



I* a 



i 



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t^f=^ 



And dan_cers fly_ ing", jost-Iing" 

- ^ N N I ^ v r v = 



r i : •' I r 



leap_ ing" yes yes, eehi 



K N^ 



N K 



» » 



1*^ tara _ ta 

FORTE.- "*""• 



i 



4 



And- dan.cers f ly_ ing", jost.ling" leap- ing* yes yes, eehJ harm 




The Ear- ring. F. Schira 



Ped 



31 



TRUMPETS. 



i 



f W 



^ T i' r ^ I; ^-^ ^ i ; I rr ^ n rt 



i=3: 



peh: 



tara_ta 



And dan_cers fly.ing" jostling" leap-ing- I 



$ 



te 



^ 



.r.NJj J- 



N— K 



1 \> »' • ' J — ^ 



PIANO eeh.' 

FORTE 



♦ # 

mRM. tara_ta m.ri^. And dan _ cers flv-ing- iostling' 

"""• PUttOE^TE. "^'^"•pitwnFnwTP - [< ^ t.J 6 



leap-ing" I 




^ #^ tlj > tf- p 



*r' ^r *r I r ¥ ^r *r I r ^r qr 



gridando 



^ 



like t 



like sounds quick and 



loud .... and loud 




like I 



like sounds quick and 



loud .... and loud 




^ 



\: ir Ir \ r ^r^ ^ 



it^lr ^ 



^^ 



^^g 



g 



t^ 



i h ' iK fh 



i 



1 



« — • 



« — • 



«: — • — • 



« — • 






^ 



' j >i nfTf I f JTipi . I r-iri 



h»HlT» 



and 




The Ear-riiiTt F, Schira. 



32 



A PIANO YES, I IVIUST BE R IGHT! 

Words by DESMOND L. RYAN. "TRIO. Music by F.SCHIRA. 



CoyNTESS, 



Lucy. 



Alfred 



PIANO 



$ 



fe 



And^.^animato. 




r 1 • r r «' r k • ' 



A ujano i 



^ 



^ 



P 



3=E: 



P =n« — ^ 



1 k^ k: ^ 






piano? ytis, Imustbe rig'hti y^s, I must be 






-•^^ 



^ 



: 1= ■:= i= rJbkz 1= izir* 



TpI 



K1 r "^ LJi^ 



IT LT "i^ 3 f 




Ped 



%^r=^ 



■hJ i : Or: /s^ 



^ 



^ 



;^=;^ 



i 



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strang"er, what . . . bring"s whatbring^this stran _ g-er to my sig-ht I whatbrin^'sthis strang'erto my 



s 



S^ sv 



M 



s- . .. i' J- J- .1-^ 



m 



■^ — ^ 



m 



mzzzM. 



t) 



U 



i'lir (Vnij) ))lain far from plain, is far from plain; he Jooksjust like an 'artist 



T 



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t^ / 1/ ^ 



1/^1/ 



12= 



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M fionce came that strain, whence came that strain; I must berig-ht I must be 



rz j^.pr 



■ ■ m 



i' ^1 r '• 



ir — t? 



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m §> 



m 



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m 



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Thr^ Ear- ring, F schira . 



ij 



p 



legato . 




i 



S3 



W=m- 



P 



#-^# 



ffi 



isE^ 



i^=t^ 



;z: 



i 



fct 



iig-ht. 



to my sig-ht, whatbring's this strang"er to my sig-ht, 
A 



to my 



^ 



^ 



ts: 



^ 



¥ 



m 



i 



m 



abzzU!± 



quite, yes, yes, he looks, he looks just like an art_ist^ yes. 



he 




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a 



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rig-ht, I must be right, this is the place whence came that strain, that 






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/^ 



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a piacere 



AI19 Moderate. 



•^^ sig-hti Your business sir.' coiih^ state it 



^ 



V- 



^^ 



fct 



coiiH' state it plain.' 



sir 



m 



^ 



looks . 



t.» . ^ 



fti 



^ 



g 



P 



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"t-F- 



strain. 




All? Moderato. 

IkU ^ ^ 



Your par_don.j 



* 



m 



a-jt 



mr i 



3^ 



ii 






■f^.'^H '^ ^ 



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51 



5 



P 



Your pardon sir. 4^nd 



P 



J J . j'|j- 1- . -Nr-i ]■ i-f. .r 



^=42 



ladam, your par-don. Was it you whose sing-- ing- pain'd my ear? 




The Ear- ring. F. SfhirH. 



34 



I I J J- ]■ J I J J J J I J' . r 



was it you Did at my sing"_ing' jeer? 



P 




^ C^ iCJ c^ 



ih . .r .r 



? 



1 1 



1 1 



s 



tt 



;?= 



I did : 



just so I 



just so. 



* 



#1 c , . .^|■^.^.^■^^ 



K — ^ 




^ 



1 r 



did! 



Your pardon 






# 



ti.^ I .^ l^.r '' 



^^ 



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P 



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J^^=^ 



V V V V V 



Then wliy did you de_part From these di _ _rec_tions; 



here, you see 




The Ear-ring . F. Schira. 



35 



# 



^ 



P 



-=1 ^ 



^ 



^ 



-(■- pf f f c 
i;^ I ^ / 1/ / 



-^^ 



i 



*#= 



1/ / ' 



^ 



-]• i« !•- 



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^ 



V V V 



# 



I think you dropp'd your men _ ey 'ere the music stopp'di the music 



f 




%fei 



itopp'd 



1» !•■ 



r 1 



^^ 



tt=a: 



iz: 



V V y 



v==^ 



V . V 



V V V 



/- 



Et _ cuse me, ex _ cuse me, but Icould not stand by. Hear an A_ 



^ 




b?i. 



tFte 




m 



m ♦ <• 



it? 



m^^ 



Jfe-4 



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^ 



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ftf . ni- 



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^ 



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_ _da_g'io play'd like -a j'J^'-" I could not bear To hear that air Sang* with 




The Ear-ring . F.Srhira. 



36 



i 



Oh! with fire mv heart 



IS 



ra _ g'ing" with 



1 



V K N s 



i 



1 



W 



Oh.' with fire my heart is ra-g-ing- with 



^ 



^ 



1^- ^ "f- ' '-' ^ 



T r 



jerk like the stjueak of a pig".' 



^;i%7 f r^ 1 


<• 


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r=tj 


• 

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r — r- 


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• 


to - 

1* 


m 




• 

1* 1 


• 

I* 


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• • 

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• 


* 




p 


i 


p p 


p 


• 


p 



i 



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tzr 



fire 



my 



heart is 



ra 



# 



g-ing-I 



zz: 



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^ 



i 



i^ — f / — 1 ?- 



fire my heart is 



.g-ing-; 



/7^ 



p 






p 



? 



fe^ 



t 



like the squeak 



of a pig-! 




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A119 



J .r I J s \ ry \' \ Q^ 



Oh 



with fi 



re 



% 



my heart 



IS ra-_ g-ing* 



J J~~ 



N N 



^ 



:3: 



♦ «! 



Oh with fire 



m 



my heart 



IS 



ra - g-ing- 

_0 



^ 



I 



^ 



T 



Oh with fire 



my heart is ra _ g'ing' 



IS 



g^^ 




N »g -tog 



The Ear- ring. F.Schira 



37 



i 



^m 



iiEE^^ 



Which Mill ne'er know aug-ht as _ 



^ 



^m 



Q 



K is 



g 



>^ t< 1 n 



ly heart ... is rag'ing', 






N-^=^ 



I* ! »■ ^^ 



1 1 w- 



1^ ^ / 



-r— 

ra._ g-ing-, 



IS ra: _ _ -g-ing-, 



Which will ne'er 



^^^ 



^ 



a 



— ^^^ . -r-v- 



a^ 



• • 



^*rT-gj- 



■i « t 






^ 



^5 



^ 



« ■ N 



k k f 



^ 



^ T 



_ suag"_ _ ing" 



Which will ne'er know; 






'^.rn. 



1 1 



Which will ne'er know will ne'er know aug'ht as _ suag-ing"! 




TJir Ear- rfng . F. SPhJra . 



38 



f 



k^m 



P 



^ 



r S. I '^^T g h I *^ ^ 



which I m wa^^ing*, I'm vv-a.g'fng', yes, the . . . .fierce contest 



I r: ..r i u fe ^ 



i 



E 



i 



Isz 



^ 



*- 0- 



which Im wa-ging", I'm wa-g'ing", yes. 



yes, the fierce 



# 



^ 



? 



^^ 



P^ 



^ 



i^ 



which I m wa-g-ing", I'm wa^g'ing-, yes, which . 

PIANO FORTE . 



I'm wa.-g'ing'. 




i 



fc^ 



i^-Tti-^ 



1»~ — 0- 



^ 



Im wa.g-ing", Ini wa.g-ing". 



fc 



/ / 



which 



^ 



Which I m wag-ing*, 

N 1^ =±s: 



^ 



s^ V 



V * 



con _ _ test. 



which I'm wa.g-ing" I'm wag-ing-, 



% 



^ 



J J I J ■ 



^ 



^^ 



T» 1* 



it 



/ / / 



whicli Im wag"ing" 





i 



yes which I'm wa-g^ing", wag-ing", my 

N 




? 



1 1 



/ 



g 



g=T^ 



^ 



f i -^ J hj^.^ I, J_^ 



• • 



grrnrr 



And my bosom's fire 

i 



And liiy bo_som, njy 



# 



^NJ.F=# 



± 



KZ 



Ur • ' i -r *•' r 



1 1 



And my bo_ som's fire, 



my 



It: 



V^ 



V^ 



bo _ som's fire, 



IS 



g'uag' _ ing" the fierce con _ _test, which 



m 




The Ear- ring. K. Sohira 



39 



$ 



f 



m 



J if K \ K 



^ 



^ 



bo _ som's fire 



^ 



^S 



i 






i 



j'lnJ .ru.r ^ 



is g'uag'ing', The fierce con _ ttest which I'm wagging"! 



i \^ 



^ 



^ 



^ B* tf 



# # 



bo _ som's fire . . . is g-uag-ing", The fierce con_test which I'm wag-ing"! 




^ 



]•- ^ 



!• 1* 



? 



f 



^ 



m 



/ / / 



/ / ■ / 



lz= 



wa _ g'Jng", yes, the fierce con_ test, The fierce con_test which Im w^ag'ing"! The 



4 



% 




N . 



\^ M^- 



i 



^ 



^ 



* w 






K 



P 



Fed. 



" / 



ih -g J iiii.g .^^ 



cres. 




^S 



The fierce con _ test 



which I'm wa _ ^ g'ing" 



# 



U^ •' I 'CJ- P 



The fierce con _ test 



T» r— 1^ 



W 



con _ _test, which I'm 



w^a _ 



g-ing", The fierce con _ _ test 



^ 



i 



^^ 






crea. a poco. 

m » 



r^ 



rf 



1^ 



:sz 



i 



a g 



s;: 



^ 



^ 



~1« 



S 



^ ^r Til- : t \ ^ 



^ 



^-— =v 



? 



r — * 



which I" 



11' wa _ 



- g'ing , the con -test the con -test I'm wa _ g-ing", The 



f^ ; I J y i ^.r b.r j i y j ^^^ 



V K 



^3 



K tv 



which I'm wa - g'ing", wa-g'ing", the 



w~ — r— 

con -test I'm wa - g'ing", I'm wa_g-ing',The 



w 



w^ 



,. ,. ^r 1 ^ 



^ 



m m 



Y V . 



■c — /»- 



S 



• F 



^ / -1 ^ 



P 



/ / 



/ / 



which 




I'm wa_ g-ing-, yes, wa-g-ing-, the 



g 



j^^A_^ 



Th» Ear ring. F. Schira. 




con_test I'm wa-g-ing", I*m wa-g-ing-jThe 



^ 



I 



i± 




J ^3^ 



^ 



Harm: colo. 



^F=& 



40 



S 



^^ 



Jf 



m ' 



k 



oon.test I'm u;i_g-itig*, I'r 






-K- 



K 



^ 



C 



— g-ing", the con _ test I'm wa _ g-ing', 



^^M 



^ 



riv 



N ^'^ N^— 1 



con -test I'm wa_g'iiig', I'm 



wa_g-ing-, the con_test I'm wa _ g-jng", 



Nr- 



t^f ±=^^ 



r: 



^^ 



^ 



P 



con_test I'm wa- g-ing*, 

PIANO FORTE. 



'm wa_g-ing-, the 



con_test I'm wa _ g-ing", 




w a -g-ing", the con_test I'm wa_g-ing-, 



i 



...r-.Nj'j' 



m=^ 



V N 



^ 



f 



1^ 



I'm 

Jf 



wa_ging", the con_test I'm wa-g-ing". 



I'm w a _ 



i^^ 



r i f- i r- .-i 



S^ 



V^ 



II wa_g-iiii;', the con_test I'm wa-g-ing", 

• I: 1^1 m - PIANO FORTE 



I'm wa 




& 



:3-3: 



■ 11 



.// 



/ 



/ 



3=3: 



-^^^H- 



^ 



Fed 



Fed 



I 



- M^ing", yp«> wag-ing- 



<fijj lj-^_l^ i^ 



a 



t^* 



-g-i'i^-.yes, 

m 'm 



Waging" ! 



^^ 

•^ .r.-^. 



i 



g-ing", yes, wag"ing"i 




The Kar-riiig, F. Spliira, 



me. 



41 



I ONCE KNEW AN ARTIST 



SONG. 



F. SCHIRA 



Allegro 
Moderato . 




Lucy. k k K 



^ 



ts: 



ft 



J I I* J 1 J J 



4^ 



-^1; r- 1 



♦ — * 



^ 



r 



I onceknewan Artist, As fair as A _ pol _ lo, Tlic art of a 



harm: SOLO 
'poco tneno mosso. 





O 



ts: 



^ 



0» 



N 



ts: 



^ 



EES 



1 r 



^ 



__?^' 



IP — ^ 

painter He voM'd he 



^\()u!(l 



fol _ low 



Ah: 



ah: 



re_ 



A 



i» 



-=1 F F- 



r r — -F — ■ 



colla vove. 



J. 



r^ 



■^ P F- 



rr\ 



-r — r- r 



k 



The Ear-ring. F.s<hira. 



4g 




i^ 



Hotto voce. 



P 



N IV S. 



•*i J J hi 



P 



P 



•' ' ^ k 



-mem.ber him . . . on_ly too well, For at love making' he was knownto ex„ 



i=zi3i 



^ 



^ 



te 



PIANO FORTE . / J 



coll a voce. 



4 



N 



1 r 



3:; 



1 k "I !>> 1 



■^1 F- 



»tr-» 




K K 



K r> ^ P K 



^ 



a tempo. 



P 



P 



•^l # 



I re _ member him . . . «mi _ ly too 



well, 



Af love 




poco pill animato. 




a^ 



p Oi *-• 



volla voce. 



1 \r 1 -^ 




The Ear ring. F. schlnt. 



un poco meno, 



•J 



43 
A A A A 



^ 



1 r 



♦ -0 



i 



#c7:__ * ^_^_v -F 



•*- , r-^ 



C'V^l « • a • 



I re_mem_ber him too well . . 



y^ 



u 



a 



P 



IL 



■^ 







tto voce . 



^£ 



*£PP 




ftl'P 



Fed. 



Fed. 



Fed 



r r 



fc=£& 



soffo uoce. 



-^^- 



Povo piv moHSo. 



S- 






dim. 



i 



^- 1 T • " ^ 



a 



s. s. s s =s; 



1 



I 



-"•^ TZ3^ 



♦l^ # 

1^ •# -r tt IT 

I i'e_mt'm_ber him too well . . 



too well .... ~~^ too 




Fed, 




The Ear- ring, F. Schira. 



44 




i 



1? tempo. •< 



N K 



N 



ts: 



^ 



K 



N N N N 



b j r -1 



P 



^ • 1 • ^ t| " ^ 



^ 



# — # 



^— ^ 



« — # 



IT 

He painted my portrait, I sat and ad - mir'd him. He made me be_ 

harm: SOLO. r J f » > 

pot'o meno niosso. 





N 



r> 



r> 



N N 



i 



-Rr 



# 



N 1 r 



i 



*^— — -"^ 



_lieve 



I >vifl) true love had fir'd him.' 



N 



Ah: 



ah .' I gave 

-^ 



1 r r - 



i 



colla voce. 



J. 



-^^ 



J^ 



f-? ■ (g 



-=1 F= P- 




b^ 



m 



^ ^ 



'v 






i 



him my 



heart. ..but now he is gonei 

s 



And 



am 



i 



f 



PIANO FORTE , 



folia vovf. 

\ 



The Ear-ring. F. Schira . 



45 



^ 



i 



K 



left 



' Y^> ^ 



mourn _ Jiig sad 



- h 



a . 



lone 



J t|J 
I g'ave 



N 



1 i. ii ' 



m 



■^ 



K 



# 



^ 



m 




K- 



r\ 



^^ 






piv animato, 



K- 



iS- 



i 



my 



heart 



but he is 




gone 

poco piu animato 



And I 




coila Voce. P 




The Ear-ring. F. Sfhira , 



t 



k 



un poco meno. 



46 
A A A /I 

^ ^ N s ^A 



^ 



^ 



3?S 



f 



^ p- 



-^ 



s — ^ — F=- 



_ _lone . . . . 



I am left a _ lone, a » lone,. 



i 



s 



M 



W 



V- 



-^ 



m 






■#V<^1?rnp «(itto voce 



£PP 



mg 



ffl 



^ 



Fed 



i 



^ 



so^fo voce. 






-4CV 



Fed 

Poeo p^■^/ mosao. 



i 



-jt 



b— 



J J ; 



1 



I 



1 1 • ^ 



mourn.ing sad _ 1) 



w 
yes 



a _ _ lone 

^^ animafo, ^^-^ 




Fed 



^^f. 



^ 



dzm 



fv 



A 



ly y ~ 



-/=--^ 



I 



S- 



?:z 



^11' - 



1 1 • 



s: 



1 1 • 



_ lone . . . . 



a _ lone . . . 



a _ lone . 



a 




ffl 



1^ 



?#^* 



m 



%M 



V Fed r 



dim. 



v^i^ 



V 




rff// i/n 'j)(n-o. 



£: 



ta: 



^ 



jrri. 



piu mosso. 



Fed 



Fed 



i 



1 ^ ni 



dim. 



jCx. 



& 



I 



1 r 



^ 



i 



_ _ lone 
affrettando. 



^ 



*r^ f ^ 8va- 



l(M: 



J^^L 



^S 



i=# 



f 




-^ 



1 r 



/ / I.- 



p/3 



N 



j::^ 



m 



Psd. 



1 r 



* 7^. 



« 



Th^ Ear-ring . F. schira 



47 



OH WIY LIFE IS WEARY. 



m7. 



SONG 



F. SCHIRA 



YOIC E. 



PIANO. 



m 



m 



^m 



Moderato Pastorale . 



p 



# 



s 



§= 



ff 



■^ M^^ -, 1 f 



« 



Ped. 



r 



^ 



kfa"^ ^ 



p 



sin 



fe^ 



\ 



sc 



* 



Alfred . 




/Ppd. 



The Ear. ring, F. Srhira. 



#^ 



pp. \, 



m 



48 



g 



•; 



day 



All a - lone 



i 



the live long day 



Its 



con 

N 



F'lFi 



-'F^ 



HARMISOCO. 



* PP * 



^m 



SEZUff 



s 



^ 



^ 







Jl 



m 



#. 



PUNO FORTE. ^ 



Fed. 



P 



J bit J 



^ 



^ 



t 



^ 



:# 



tOi 



_ foiin _ ded drear _ y drear _ y drear _ y drear _ 




03 



N_ 



^ 



tni 



:^ 



y oh .' n\y 







W 



i 



^ 



\ 



N 



/ 



i 



u 



i 



ipt 



K 



-^i» 



^ 



Sl(n\ the hours 



pass 



a _ way. 



3t 



^ 



SloM' the 



f 



^ 



P 




i 



i 



fenfo. >- rail. 



!* 



in tempo . 



i 



f^ 



^ 



fc 



hours, yes, pass. . 




a _ 



_ way,' 



N_ 



Oh my life is wear _ y, 



3^ 



-=V 



■=£: 



=^ 



PfANQ FOHTE 



r>. 







^^ 



The F-ar ring. F.Sphira. 



dim . . e 




Recit. 




a J) I nee re 



^ .r J .r 



^ 



J r J" J 



^^ 



b i r ( ) r 



She wont come 



oh this is ob_sti_ na_cvJ 



■^ — F- 



1 r 



N 



1 r 



1 r 




^t 



^ #^ 



7? tt^mpo. 



yi=fF S 



^^ 



-=f-^ 



;2: 



hut I'll he obstinate too 



irj^j 



ag:^ 



^ 



-=^-F- 



Fed. '^ '^ 



g 



^ 



^ 



"T 



The Ear- ring . F. Schira . 



50 




> 



Oh 



i 



^ 



for 

K_ 



P 



i 



ij 



wo.. ..man's smiles to 

_J5s 1 ts. 



11* 



^^ r 



H 



i 



^ 



i 



^ 



j-^ J-^ 



::^ 



fe 



fe 



/if / 



^^^-.i-ni 



^ 



is 



1 1 



zzzitt 



bless me, yes, for wo _ man's wo _ man's smile. 



Oh for 




i 



N 



^ 



m^r-^ 



% 



^ 



WO _ man's voice to cheer. 



Oh for MO _ man's voice to 




i 



N 



IB? 



t 



HARM; SOLO 



^ 



■ PP^ 



m 



* 



pp 




The Ear-ring. F. Sthira 



51 



$ 



M 



M 



±1 



V / 



hands, oh wo _ man's hands 



^ 



When no o _ _ther soul is 




r "^ ^ r ' 



f^ 



Tall, 



rail. r:\ 




] — W 



hands too to 



ca_ ress me, When no o _ 



^ 



.thor soul is 

cull a voce. /^ 

-K 



^ 



p 



?= 



rr^ -^ 



r- 



v^ 



i^STl 



ai4 



y < . 



bi 



■:^^ 




>- dim e semp rt. 

^ r rr 



_- j -->.,4?o//a 



VO(t. 



m — 



^ 



C\ 



/ 1 1 r -^ 



11 



near 



^^ 




J 



N 



i>i. ' \ 

^ 



:^z 



F 



^—j^-d 



K 



s^ « 






> 



ftiyjpo. 

The Ear-ring. F.Schirs. 



^ 



7* 



I 



Bya 



1 1 r 1 1 



N 



/'/"^ 



-^^-^ 



k 



^ 



C^ 



1 1 r 1 - 



PP 



r^ 



1 1 r -] ■ 



S2 



WHEN WUSIC'S CHARMS FALL ON lYIY EARS. 



ms. 



DIET. 



F. SCHIRA. 



Larghetto 
Cantabile. 




fe 



|9 



-Nc- 



ff nd. 



ES 



■ 1 1 r - 



r 



^ — • — •- 



■=■ 9. 



1 1 r ^ 



y 



* 



^m 



r\ 



i 



^ 



0\ 



Alfred, dolce. 



^ — '- 



f 



Wlien . 



mil _ 8ic's 




I 



3hir3. 4 -•• 4 ^- ■•- 

* ■%■ -•■ -•■ -•■ * -•• -•■ 
-m- -^ -m- -v- -m- -ii- -m- -#l 



:*n. •. Ji ji J. 4 -*: 

-5- -i- ^ ^ -5-^-f ^ -p- 



^ i^i» ir ir i ^-« ir i 



T 



i 



!* 



OF 



p 



!* 



N A N 



•' \U ' J 



1 r n 



charms fall on my ears, 



V 



fall ♦in my ears 




The Ear- riiiiS, I, eehira. 



53 



$ 



fe 
"%=; 



du/ee rail. 



i 



!* 



-^ 



V A 



P=3 



S 



-lS — - 



m I # 



K- 



12= 



/ k 






ir 



Their sweet en _ chant _ ment calm my fears,calm my 







^: 



3 5 3 *«t*<i¥*'^** 



^ 



• •' 






^ 



S 



!* 



Countess. ^^^<'' 



'.e. 



^^ 



? 



» r 



f 



^ 



Wh 



en 



mu_ sic's charms fall on my 



i 



N_ 



^ 1 1 r ^ 



s 



fears ! . . . 




KIT~~* 



^ 



«-« 



• I • 





dim. 



:iri~iri: 

-•--•--•■ -•■ hi 



• — '-m 



i: 3: 3: 



3. 3: 



5 r 



A 

W — S" 



! • 1 r -^ 



bb d 



W i" 



? 



i 



te 



^ 



S A N 



i 



^h d * 



ip 



^ 1 1 r — =h 



tsirs. 



fall on my ears 



$ 



^ 



Jf 



Their 



SMeet en_ 



g , r 1 



# * i » p q p 



- 1 1 T IT 1 



^ ' ^ — 

Yes, calm my fears, . . calm my fears . .\ 



^ 



m 



3 



i 



i 



w^ 



iiiii • C 



» -^- d •! •! • 



i:i?^Fa 



37*73 rini:^ 






k 



!,■•--•--•- -4 -O^-d-' -#i- -•(- -•. 



w 



t 



w 



p 



f 



1 r 1 



The Ear-ring. F. Schira. 



54 



dolce rail vn foco. 



W=^ 



iE 



K 



^ 



^ /- 



V 



- _ chant _ nient calm my fears, calm my 



^ 



J 



!• (• ^ 



• 



P 



r 1 r 1 



— y" ^ — b^ 

Their sweet en _ chant _ 

A 



_ment 



calm my 




mS 




imi»^ > > 



• — • 



colla voce. 



P 



^ 



m 



sotto voce. 
K £=^—r 



^m 




d 1 r 1 T 



If 



fears • 



When tune 



t 



te 



^ 



ful voi_ _ces 

T^ v : r m \>^ 



^ z fe 



¥ 



f 



:3: 



fears, yes, When tune_ _ _ _ _ _ful vui _ _ces 




i 



!* 



K 



§E^ 



^ 



f 



fe^^=^ 



smg, 



smg 



Pl ^ I* \f 



lay, . . And drive 

V 




sa<] spir _ its 

It 



4« 



i 



1 r 



iti 



sim 



a lav. 



And drive sad spir _ its 




The Ear-ring. F. Schira 



55 




har _ mony. Bring' p^ace. and joy. ... to you and me, ah.' 



N- 



K. 



1 1 • iJ 



m 



i£ 



<lf 



^ 



1 r 1 



They . . . with each strain of har_ mony , . 



Bring peace and 




Jht E«T jring. F, Schira . 



i 



te 



^ 






56 
rall:un poco in ttmpo. 



P K 



P 



3 



joy; 



^ 



tt 




ohl yes, peaceand joy! They . . .with each strain of 



I 



.£d'i^ - ' r i j' 



w 



1 1 r 1 -F- 



joy, 



, oh I yes, peace and joy i . 

in ttmpo. 




$ 



K. 



fv 1^^ V 



s 



l^=? 



w^ 



I 1 



p^ 



i 



ti 



har _ mo _ ny, 



Bring peace and joy to you and 



fe 



m=^ 



W ^ 'h ^ ^ 



1 r 4- 



^ — ^ 



r- 



They . . ; . with each strain of har_ _mo_nv, . . 




Bring peace and joy, to you, and me, yes, 




Thf Ear-ring. F. Schira 



57 
^^11' un ]puce meriQ sottu voce. 




i 



^^ 



and peace and joy'. 



to you, 



^m 



W^. and neace 



f 



m 



3=z3: 



^rz^tz^ 



f=M 



^ 



joy»- 



and peace and joy ! 



to you, and 




dolcissimOf e sotfo voce. 




The Ear- ring. F.Schirs . 



58 



THE LIVE LONG DAY BY lYIOUNTAINS aiDE 



M^.9. 



SO]\G. 



F.SCHIRA. 



Moderate, 



HARI»; SOLO. 





£ 



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p 



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Alfred. 



K 



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1)\ moun_tains 



The live long day 



r\ 



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HARM 



SOLO. 






rv 



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p 



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tend my bleat _ ing wand _ ring flocks , my flock. 



S 




Thf Kar ring . F. Schira 



59 



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homeward lead at e_ _ven _ tide, From herb .age sweet a_moiig- the 





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flow'i's, and frag _ rant thvme ; .... In _ hal _ ino: scents of s\veet wilfl 



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HARM -.SOLO. 



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T^ild rose, wild 



rose, wild rose . . . 

PiANtI FORTE. 



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rose And 



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Thf- Ear- ring. F. Schira 




Fed 



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i^-aft _ ed through the dell, yes, through the 



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The Ear-ring . F. Schira 




di 



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61 



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Is not more buoyant or 



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more free! 




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stentate. 



/J O ' 

I PiANO FORTE , 



Fed.'P- • PP 




The Ear--ring. F. Srhira 



62 



HO! JEAN, WHAT BRINGS YOU HERE. 



m 10, 

Words by DESMOND L.RYAN. 



FIIVALE. 



F.SCHIRA. 



Countess. 



Jean. 



Allegro 
ivioderato 



i 



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m 



J"i r 1 > * i" r I * ' -i ^ 



p 



Ail? Modtp 



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Ho! Jean, what bring-s you here? 

, -^ r r p r 









N- 



3=± 



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My master sends you 



3=± 




V- 9) 



r ^ t^ I' f p#= 



m 



^ 



■NN r i; i: r P^M^^ 



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g-reeting", yes, sends you greeting"; An ac'_ ci_dent he's met with. His life may'een be 




tsz 




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fleeting", So to your La_dy _ ship. He sends this bil_let _ doux , To keep him in your 



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a pidcere. 



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What does this mean, what does this meansThis is to Mademoiselle Ang-e. 

C\ 



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niiiul, Till he Can come and sue I 




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/P«d. 



63 



i 



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in tempo , 



l^^^ 



-line! 



p.j n } nJ | j J J JiJj^ 



-n— F- 



What can it mean, A note for Mademoiselle An_g"e line I 



i 



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r r P r ^rir r r p t-pp np 



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What can it mean, A note for Mademoiselle An_g«_ _line! 



what can it 



C r, C t C 



m 



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/: 



Rag's and shame my sen _ _ ses 



• — •■ 



El 



IS 



t 1 1 g IT jT i¥ 

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v^at can it miean? 



what can it mean 



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m u 



■^[Readin^ the letter i^ 
■'mt dear anceuhe, 

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1 r 



meani 



what can it mean? 



what can it mean? 



W: 



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V V V r^ =F 



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Ire been and g'i.ven her the wrong- let _ _terl 



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^-^^ y a piacere 



m 



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fct 



m 



Mbderato 






Sr 



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• ^ •! 



1 SHALL BE WITH YOU , 

THIS EVEHiNC" Tis e _ nough, 



'tis e _ _ 



J::^. 



_ _ noug-h! 

^ ^ 



Go you Sir un_ _to your 



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C\ 



5 



The Ear-ring. F.Schira, 



64 



^^^^ 




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mistress. But ne_vermore, 



to come to me, 



no nevertiiore, 



to come to 




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1 :];Vr'i'^^ a 



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you Sir uii _ to your 



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what can it mean? 



fcif±a 



what can it mean? 



a nute i'nv An _ _ _ _ g'e- 



^ 



^ ^ p F- P ^ ^ i ^ '^ 1^ ^ ^ 



t?=c 



what can it mean? 



w+iat can it mean? 



w+iat can it mean? 



A notefor An-U'e. 



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N- 



ra""e and shaine , 



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rag-e and shame, 



rag'e and slianie my senses 



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The K;ir ling. F. S'liira . 



tell him that now is 



, i^J^i^j'. 



_ line. 



what can it mean? 



what can it mean? 



a note for Aji 



- - ?i< 



Iine-whatca 



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f; s r r 



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^—4 



[^ ^ t^ > k 



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ine,whatcan it mean? 



what can it mean? 



wiiat can it mean? 



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a note for An _ g-e 



m 



^ 



FT r ' ^ 



^ 



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fetter, 



rag-e and shame. 



rag-e and shame. 



rag"e andshame,niy sen_ses 




The Ear-ring. F. Schira. 



66 




^ C^ U -^ «g^ I i T ^ ^J 



iML 



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f ^^>'"r 



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me: no. 



ne _ 



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more, 



no. 



no, never more,no never 



^ 



^^:kj^Jf^ 



1^=^ 



t=^ 



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mean; 



what 



can 



It 



means 



note for Ah_g"eIineWliatcan jt 



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note for An_g-elineHTiatcanit 



meani what . . can . it • . meani A . . note tor An_g-ehneHhatci 




letterragt'ajidshiimeny senses fetter rag-eandshamemy senses fetter yes Ivebeenandg-ivenher and g"iven her yes the wrong* 



m 



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The Ear ring . F, Schira , 



.ff 



r 



67 



iA 



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more 



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meant:: ^ can it mean, can it meaht 



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mean 



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fes 



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letter, rag-e and shame, rag-e and shiune I 

harm: SOLO. lento. 





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cfi 



m 



rail un poeo. do Ice . 

AAA AAA 



p ^■'' I ^ \' \' rip r P P I r P p F 



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peasant's plaintiyt; strain, the plaintive 



te 



»=± 



1 — b: l ^ 



strain, OhI sing* to me, oh.' sing" tu 

colla voce. 



i 



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te=| 



dim . 



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J" 



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p/3 alar^dnd 




The Ear--rin|. F. Schira 



68 



i 



m « 



nie 



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a piaeere 



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m • - m 



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You then know it? 




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J n 



speak . . 



oh! 



± 



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speak, you know it? 




f 



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PP f^/i tempo 




raz 



All? Mod^o 




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oh! what rapture Fills my heart, at that svr'eet thought.' My bright 

T. 9 dill It I Oj\i\/>i\Ai\/^/\i\i%ri\j\A/\j\i\i\i\i\/t/vfk/vj\ri\fvfj\i\j\ri\i\j\i\i\i^^ 



-^- 



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XT 



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•V PIANO FORIE 



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stentafe, 

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Presto, 



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vis _ ion of the mountain, Back to me a g-ain is 

^l^J^^/^^M^J^^i^i^/kArJ\f^AM^^J^/^l^^i^rv/«/v/vi^fM\i^i\J\l^ 



broug-ht I 



For mercy 



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a place r e . 



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p> t^ p^ t^ p/ =^ 



ill calzando , 



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I have the o _ ther ear-ring" here, you 

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speak . . . speak . . 



are 




you then she? 



HARBI;SOLO 



n\ 



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1 r • w±L 



Q: 



colla voce , 



Presto 



/ 



fa=^ 



n\ 



vxx. 



^^=E: 



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The Ear-ring. F ScJiira. 



Alfred. ^^ 



AUe|ro 




Alfred. Hurr ah I what weig'ht My wis dom car _ ries, My la- _dy now. An ar _ tist 



m 



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Y 1 



^' love 1 

Jean. 



m 



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Hurrah I 



Hurrah I 




n^^ 



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a ^lacere. 

m ■ I * 



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hurrah! hur_ _ rah ! Let's make a 



u u u 



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s 



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o 



•— • — 5-» 



SI 



• — S-* 



"'l-f- 



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nt 



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a piaeere, ^ 



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al ml M) 



f tut ir 



A groom, tho' fine, 



i 



Is not an ar_tistl 



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Of gl-oomslm smartest.' 



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lento, ^ ^^11^ ^^^^ 

19 



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f: 



The Ear--ring. F. Schira. 



70 



A-Uegro Moderate. 



sotto voce. 



Py n I r? J- # 



Oh I the ra _ _ diant, the 



P 



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tz 



Ohl the ra _ _ diant, the 



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Ohl the ra_ 
/3 



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_ diant, the 

m_ 



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Oh 1 the ra _ _ diant, the 




u cJ • 



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cres. 



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^ 



^ 



ra _ diant moments wing"_ _ ing-, On their 



flig-ht 



to 
dim. 



hap _ _ py 



N • \ ' N 



i 



i 



* . * 



ra _ diant moments wing-. _ ing", 



On their 

cres. 



f liifht to hap _ _ pv 

PP. 



7» 0— -|» 



^ 1^ 



ra _ diant moments 



^= ^ =^ 



wing- _ _ ing-. On 



i 



their ftijrht to 



d& 



n 



hap _ _ py 



^ 



ra _ diant moments wing-_ _ ing*, On their flig"ht to hap _■ _ py 




The Ear-ring. F. Schira 



7J 



9 



^r 



^ 

^ 



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fa 



ra _ _ 



_ _ diant mo _ _ _ _ merits wing'ing", On their flig-ht, on their flig"ht, 






to 



y I y .1 . 



N N f^ 



^ 



; .1- 1 . 1 ■ 



♦ — -♦■ 



ra. 



_ diant moments 



wing"inu , On their flig-ht, 



their flig-ht, 



to 



m 



m 



P I* 



^ 



to 



f 



f 



V / 



P=F 



ra_ _ _ ,_ diant mo _ _ _ _ in^n+s wing-ing", On their flig-ht. 



^ 



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their flig-ht, . 



I f I ^ ^ ^ J 



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j;^=2: 



oh the radiant moments moments wing-ing", On their flig-ht, to hap_py hours,yes, on their 

-i, — ]?!-. — *— - — = i- 




- - py 



hours, Brig-htest hap_ _ pi „ ness an 



jring-ing-, Yes, while 



Nr- 



ffy J I y 



Nr- 



^ 



P 



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hap _ pi_ _ness are bring-ing-, 

^:^ ->- -=. ^ ^^ 



hap_ py 



hours , Brig-htest 



m 



iE 



m. 



Yes, while 



m 



i 



s 



hap _ py 



hours, Brig-htest hap _ pi _ ness are bring-ing". Yes, while 



' ^ t f t f \^\'r r If ^ ^ 



^=^ 



flig-ht to hap _ py hours, Brig-htest 



hap 



bring-ing-, Yes, while 




m 



i 



For _ tune's fa _ Tour 
:=» r> >► ~2^ 

-N N r^- — ==^ 



show^rs 



hap _ py, hap _ py hours, oh hap_ _ | 



Fortune's fa _ vour 



^ 



Fortune's fa _ your 



W^ ==^ 



f ^ t 



Fortunes fa _ Tour show'rsjyes, 



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The Ear-ring. F, Schira. 



72 

■^uilo voce. -^ — ■ — — TTTSr"— -s" ' 



/r 



\f\f\r>tJ\rrs)S*j\iyj\f\/\ 



jc 



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hours 



c'reS, '. 



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happy hours, 



fe k "^ 



♦ 0- 



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hours, h\[)py hours, hap, py hours, hap _py hours, hap_py hours, happy' hours. 



^^ 



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^ 



i^ tg l^ 



hours, Oh 



ra_ _diarit 



moments. 



^ 



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hap _ _ py 



hours, happy^ hours, 



r *r i^^^ri 



/^— ^ 



L^ 1 



hours, Oh 



ra_ _ diant 



monients, 



hap - - py 



hours, happy hours. 




:£ 



leggier o. , 



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La 



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hap_py hours. 



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Heart in heart to _ _ g-eth _ ^~fir, to _ 



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happy hours. 




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Heart in heart to _ 

« • 



g'ether twinincr, 



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la. . . . 



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.... la hi. ;. . .... la la. . . 



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, ""''th _ 



_ er twining-, We 11 to 



sorl _ _row, to 



sor_ _ '_ row, yes. 



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They 11 to sor _ row bid a _ dieu yeSj ne _ ver, ne _ ver more to be re _ 



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The Ear- ling . F.Schira , 




_ 5Jfeth_ _ er 



yes 



twin_ _injr 



p 



ff PfiK , . , ff pp 



oh yes well to sor _ _ _ _ row yes, bid a_ 



f-^-Nr 



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_ g-eth _ _ er .yes 



twin- _ insT 



oh 



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yes theyll to sor _ _ row oh yes, bid 



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g-iith _ _ er yr'S twin_ - ing* oh yes we'll to sor_ row 

4^. 



■^■T '^^i; i: I '7 '-''f f 1/ 'n 



oh yes^ bid a. 



ffi 



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-g-eth- _ er yes twin_ _ jng- oh yes theyll to 



sor _ _ row 



oh yes, bid a- 




The Ear- ring. F. Srhira , 



74 



I 



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£ 



All? vivo. 

A 



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p 



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a 



-dieu, .... a _ _ dieu 



to sor_ _ row a_ _dieu. 



yesl 



fnfne, .Te^, 



/h. ? l i(7 



« 



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^=3: 



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_tlieu, a_ _ _ _ dieu, 



to 



sor_ _ row a_ _d 



leu. 



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_ rlieu, a_ _ _ _dieu, 



to sor_ _ row a_ _dieu. yesl ////ne_ _ Ter, 



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to sor_ _ row a_ _dieu. yesl 



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ne_ _ Ter , 



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fe- 



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ne_ _Ter, 



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pfP legato 



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But with loTe , life 



to 



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ne _ _ Ter, 






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